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Three Skills to be a Successful Entrepreneur

No man is an island. No business is either. It’s helpful to learn from those who are a few steps ahead or are walking stably beside you. Now is the time to accelerate progress through networking and collaboration in order to enjoy exponential improvements and growth. Our panel of fourteen experts offers invaluable insights into the question: What are three priority skills needed to be a successful entrepreneur?

From our Experts:

Tom Ruwitch

1. Persistence... Entrepreneurs are bound to fail from time to time in their journeys. You can't quit the first time you fail.

2. Interpersonal skills... You must work well with others if you want to be a successful entrepreneur. Working alone in a garage is a mythical image.

3. A willingness to let go and delegate… You can't do it all yourself. Build a team. Establish structure. Don't try to juggle it all.

Stephen Hager

1. Fire in your belly to do something different, better and take-on risk

2. A picture of success, vision and desired outcomes with leaky boundaries

3. Surround self with people smarter and different than you who support your picture of success

Adam Kreitman

1. The ability to sell

2. The ability to delegate

3. The ability to learn from failure (or, better yet, the failures of others)

Steve Smart

1. The ability to lead with vision: The ability to see, define and rally others to a future state is critical for long-term success.

2. The ability to incorporate the right talent: No one can do it all on their own. It becomes critical to recognize that fact, develop a high performing team and delegate well.

3. The ability to manage change: With a growing business, change is happening all over. Within the organization, within the industry and in the business world in general. Being able to manage change and lead the organization in the midst of it is important.

Jared Peno

Along with personal traits such as perseverance, self-motivation, and focus, I think having the following skills is vitally important to an entrepreneur's success:

1. First, you must have a marketable service or product. If you don't, then you have nothing to sell and no platform for becoming an entrepreneur.

2. Second, you need to have vision. When you are starting out, take advantage of your ability to adjust to demands and trends quickly; always have an eye for opportunity.

3. Lastly, and I believe most importantly, you need to be able to grow your personal network. Entrepreneurs sell solutions and the more people you know the more people you can potentially help. Your worth as an entrepreneur is directly tied with how well and how many people you can help. Creating an ever-growing network of people allows for more relationships and more opportunities for you to solve problems.

These are just a few of the Partner responses.

Check out this article in the academy to get all responses

Video: The Gateway to Dreams

Have a dream you’ve always wanted to fulfill but felt was impossible? Don’t be too hasty giving up on it…

Dream Champion, Queen of Possibilities, and Innovator Karen Hoffman has always looked for systems to help people discover possibilities not seen at first glance by the majority of people. She encourages viewers by her magical stories about:

  • Finding money for people who are not normally able to find it
  • Engaging in deeply satisfying exchanges of energy and services through barter
  • Reviewing and choosing new and often better life priorities by rallying and leveraging leveraging personal setbacks and crisis
  • Living from what you enjoy doing and being who you are unconditionally
  • Powerful books with game-changer and life-enhancing themes
  • Recognizing and seizing opportunities life presents even if they seem to big and scare you
  • Generosity and friendship that magnifies success and progress
  • Dreams currently being actualized due to collaboration and commitment

As founder of Gateway to Dreams, Karen Hoffman continues helping people to achieve rapid fulfillment of their dreams through relationships and collaboration. She provides the space, the connections, the ideas, the enthusiasm and proven processes for making positive dreams happen. You can contact Karen at Karen@cityofexperts.com

Moving from Victim to Victory Consciousness

The job of a good leader is to help a person become responsible by transferring responsibility to them so they live their purpose.

As a child deeply in love with nature, living on the edge of a park, and the fifth of six children, I knew a lot about chaos, the beautiful, free, creative and exhilarating kind. Starting out free to explore from infancy, school at age five felt like bitter confinement and at times crushing domination, and was the first time I was acutely aware of the down-side to our civilization process. As a result, I have always been drawn to unorthodox concepts of how people might form community, develop into good, contributing, caring citizens who are empowered to be victorious in their lives. In the last 30 years I have turned that awareness into an obsession (and a company), leading to questions that have since liberated my life and the lives of others.

  • How can we shift the civilization process so that rather than diminish people and demean the human spirit, each person is assisted in expanding into their wholeness?
  • What can we do to create a world in which it feels safe to be powerfully influential, inventive, vulnerable, creative and collaborative so that we are authentically free co-creators?
  • What does an organization look like in which people thrive rather than simply survive?
  • How do we avoid that which makes us feel and act like victims and rebels and absorb that, which makes us empowered, contributing and accountable?

It’s clear our current organizational structures are not working well. News headlines make us all too aware of the meaning of the term dysfunctional within schools, families, businesses and institutions. Schools struggle to effectively educate, many businesses, marriages and families are in a state of crisis. And then there’s the current state of health care, the economy, welfare, our judicial systems, the environment, and governments, to name a few.

Additionally, a requirement for mutual cooperation is essential as we expand our increasingly technological and global community. We are evolving at an accelerated pace which creates greater stress and a pressing need to be more inter-dependent and streamlined in our evolution. What once took years and even decades to create now takes only months or days and our outdated organizational systems can’t keep up with our present or future. What’s the answer?

Recently, in studying a variety of organizational models, I was delighted to discover a human system that is synonymous with the work of my company LifeWork Systems. The model is called a chaord, derived from a combination of the words chaos and order. In a chaord, all the best within human beings and all manner of systems are honored and focused towards what is both most meaningful and effective.

Leading scientists from many disciplines have recently discovered that life itself thrives on the edge of chaos with just enough order to give it patterns we have taken for granted and assumed developed in a linear, plodding manner. It’s just not true. Much of what exists in nature formed in both a complex and simultaneous way. In other words, a variety of systems acting independently worked in harmony to rapidly collaborate and create what could not otherwise occur. Nature literally explodes with creativity and cooperation. What’s key is that each element involved in any healthy system not be confused nor impeded in living to their distinct purpose, values and vision.

A chaord is similar to this beautiful discovery in nature; when people share power, are equipped to co-create change, and independently self-govern, then everyone can harmoniously blend available chaos with order for rapid, effective change. In ordered chaos, each person is first and foremost purpose-oriented, focused on individual and group purpose, values and visions. Next, everyone is organized to expediently harness the creativity, gifts, initiative and collective talents available in service to that purpose or vision. Ordered chaos is to vision what a bow and arrow is to a target. Control is released so the arrow can literally fly to the target. This is the path from victim to victor.

What does this mean specifically? Organizations operating as a chaord function by a set of principles in which power is shared, knowledge and initiative are distributed at all levels and self-governing, socially and emotionally intelligent individuals and teams work independently to accomplish their goals with faith in each other to deliver their part. Imagine homes, educational institutions, community organizations and businesses in which adults and children learn to share decision-making, governing, and whole tasks are delegated to individuals and teams independently and yet, interdependently.

In this system internal motivation, purpose, vision and self-management are top priorities that replace traditional command and control, linear top-down managing so that joyful participation from passion and purpose reign. I have successfully created this very system in my own family and in client sites, including businesses, non-profit organizations, churches and schools.

During the first half of the 21st century, it was the practice of parents to shape the minds and hearts and lives of their children and to a large extent this is still a worthy role. At that time however, this was out of balance. There was something crucial usually missing in the formula for influencing children’s lives. Too much emphasis was focused on the shaping of the child and not enough on the child’s individual internal motivation, inductive reasoning and discovery and development of their unique purpose, values and vision for their life. They were not developed into leaders and proactive participants as part of their rearing. The result: Many adults turn into people who are out of touch with their ability to make choices from internal motivation and instead feel like “victims” to the whims and preferences of others. Their internal roadmap is buried and their power atrophied.

A result from my experience of my childhood and the well-intentioned, control-driven attempts by my parents, other adults, and educators, to make me a good citizen, was an unbalanced need to do what my parents and other authorities wanted from a sense of fear and disempowerment. I have come to realize many others experience the same. Maybe that’s why Brene Brown, renounced expert researcher on Shame and Vulnerability states,

"We are the most over-weight, over-medicated, in-debt, addicted cohorts in the history of the world."

The emphasis on shaping human beings from the outside in, is costing us more than we could ever imagine and at the root of co-dependency, shame, repression, suppression, addiction and many neuroses. It is at the root of victim consciousness. When parents raise children this way and educators teach students this way and managers manage employees this way, there grows a disconnection between the one leading and the one being led, and a disconnect within each person.

During that era and today, the mainstream methods for how to lead others is still a source of much dysfunction. When we use a control-based approach for leading others, this is a form of over-protecting, pampering and spoiling. I’m not referring here to spoiling others with too many material goods but rather, with taking too much responsibility for the ideas, happiness, behavior, choices and results of those they lead.

In the words of psychologist Alfred Adler (father of individual psychology), “people often make the mistake of taking too much responsibility for other’s achievements and too much blame for their mistakes. They forget the person is always observing, interpreting and deciding for him or herself.” When we leave out the purposes and subjectivity of the individual, and don’t guide others in the wise use of their power, we are teaching others to be less responsible. What we protect we make weak and we should never do for others anything they are capable of doing for themselves.

The job of a good leader is to help a person become able to respond (responsible) in their life; to help them by transferring responsibility to them in such a manner that they discover their own high purpose and how to live it. Then they can do the same for others. It’s been my life’s work, first with my family, then in over 70 schools and now with many business and community organizations, to provide the missing tools and information that allows leaders to improve success in others and bring out the best already residing in those they lead.

We live in exciting times with tremendous opportunity to expand into the amazing, capable, creative human beings we are and to have fun alone and with others. A chaordic model is exciting because it provides meaningful uncertainties, risks, challenges and opportunities to develop leaders who contribute in ways that cannot be found in traditional models. Vision, with action, leads to infinite possibilities. It’s time to buckle up, and go for the ride of our lives. We are designed by nature itself to function within organized chaos on purpose when we are given the appropriate training and support for how to do so! We are meant to be victors, not victims!

Judy Ryan is Owner of LifeWork Systems and a human systems expert. Executives, community leaders and educators hire Judy and her company because they want the advantages of a healthy workplace. To contact her, you can call her at 314.239.4727, by emailjudy@lifeworksystems.com or on her website www.lifeworksystems.com

Video: Brain Strengths

Most people don’t know their sensory and cognitive strengths and weaknesses. When they do, they can leverage this information to be financially and socially effective.

What is brain strength and why is this important to entrepreneurs? Practical Neuroscientist Stephen Hager talks about the importance of understanding the unique make up of each person for how they like to learn, think, communicate, solve problems, make decisions and work productively.

Stephen discusses neuro-diversity starting with how people process information (sensory), including the strengths and weaknesses of each modality and our cognitive function (how we focus on and use information). He describes the importance of knowing our primary and secondary sensory styles and equally our blind spots, which indicates the style that’s our weakest and least favored. The three sensory styles and their prevalence in our world are:

  • Visual: 29% of the population.
  • Kinesthetic: 60% of the population.
  • Auditory: 11% of the population.

Our cognitive preferences are:

  • sequential (details – trees) or
  • global (big-picture – forest)

Most people don’t know their sensory and cognitive strengths and weaknesses. When they do, they can leverage this information to be effective. Stephen Hager focuses on the significance of these styles for entrepreneurs and their connection to social and financial success. For more information, check out Stephen’s video article outlining next steps, visit his website: neuidentity.com or call him at 618-977-5258.